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jknibb
26th August 2005, 06:21 AM
my setup for my 2 4WD.

Its a Garmin 60CS map conneted to a Toshiba tablepc running nRoute.

I'm supprised how long the HDD in the laptop has lasted (sofar 7 months of very rough driving).

Jeffrey

First my Grand Vitara

My SWB Vitara

Craigus
26th August 2005, 06:53 AM
Nice setup mate.. Dang there is no missing turns with that screen ay! I see it's sitting on a ram-mount too. :cool: Awesome.

vincentvega
26th August 2005, 08:12 AM
nice setup.

My boss has a very similar laptop, have been trying to convince him to do a setup like that in his car.

I am gonna go have a google for nRoute, i have never heard of it

Craigus
26th August 2005, 08:20 AM
GARMIN NROUTE (http://www.garmin.com/support/download_details.jsp?id=575)

pcman
28th September 2005, 12:10 AM
damn thats a big screen for a suzuki

atleast its easy to see

jknibb
30th September 2005, 07:45 AM
very easy to read, a little bright at night :)

UncySpam
17th October 2005, 02:05 PM
how does that mount work in regards to passenger - are they impeded by the lappy?

jknibb
17th October 2005, 02:14 PM
no problems with either car and people sitting in the passager seat. youcanmove the screen around tp make it easy for them to use the laptop as a nazi.

Moo73
18th October 2005, 03:07 PM
That is wicked. What mount have you used? Is it adjustable for different monitor/tablet sizes?

Cruzer79
24th December 2005, 08:10 PM
Mate,

Nice looking setup, looks like a nice ****pit.

Have you experienced any problems with the laptop from off road driving? I say this because you note that in your origional post.

I changed from a laptop to a PDA because my laptop was taking a beating, and I wanted more space, but you seem to be doing pretty well to fit all yours in a suzi!

jknibb
25th December 2005, 04:40 AM
thanks. Nope the laptop/tablet is still going strong with no problems. could be because its a tablet PC as their are designed to be carried around all the time.

harveym
27th February 2006, 02:32 PM
Jeffrey, that's a neat looking system. It looks as though you are using a RAM mount. Can you provide some details of it and how you attach the mount to the vehicle. RAM have some great computer car mounts but all the ones I have seen are for LH drive cars.

edmil
10th May 2006, 07:17 PM
Fantastic setup. What are you using to mount the TabletPC. I also use the GPSMap60CS mounted pretty much the same way on the screen. The laptop is currently nursed by passenger. I don't use it when there's no one else in the car. I also use nroute. hd a few problems under win 98 but not sure if it was the system just getting screwed up. Have transfered to an ACER running XP and don't have any problems. I've got oziexplorer loaded as well.

Corry
24th May 2006, 08:57 PM
Any chance of you throwing up some more photo's as to how the mount connects to the laptop? Am interested in setting up in a similar way.

cliffang83
5th October 2009, 12:06 AM
That is so nice.
Is the sound hooked to the car stereo?

Ningsheng2006
28th October 2009, 10:54 AM
Nice to have a computer doing the work. Where can we find detailed technical information to make one similar? :mighty

Michael
28th October 2009, 11:09 AM
Easy - read all the posts in this 'Show us your projects' section.

Buy a laptop, OziExplorer software (or Garmin nRoute software) a GPS that will talk to the laptop, mounts to install both in your car, maps to suit software of the area you want to travel in.

Install, turn on, have fun.

Ningsheng2006
28th October 2009, 01:59 PM
Easy - read all the posts in this 'Show us your projects' section.

Buy a laptop, OziExplorer software (or Garmin nRoute software) a GPS that will talk to the laptop, mounts to install both in your car, maps to suit software of the area you want to travel in.

Install, turn on, have fun.

So a GPS unit is needed anyway. Forgive me if my original thought of using a computer to replace the GPS was too optimistic. :soapbox

Pocileh
28th October 2009, 06:32 PM
"A" Gps-unit that can talk to the laptop.
This doesn't necessarily mean that you need to have a "full" GPS nav system like f.i. a Garmin 60..

A "mouse" GPS capable of talking to the laptop is sufficient.
And that is a kind of blackbox that receives the GPS signals, convert them into a position and sending that position to the lappy.
This mouse-GPS has no display. You could look at it as just being an active antenna for the laptop, needed because the laptop (most of them anyway :sad2 ) has no build-in GPS-receiver.

AusPak
29th October 2009, 12:54 AM
So a GPS unit is needed anyway. Forgive me if my original thought of using a computer to replace the GPS was too optimistic. :soapbox

This is the type of antena that could be used ..... antena (http://cgi.ebay.com.au/GPS-Receiver-Antenna-4-USB-Laptop-Google-Earth-Map-G2_W0QQitemZ170399298240QQcmdZViewItemQQptZAU_Elec tronics_GPS?hash=item27ac96f2c0) ..... I have been using one for a few years now .... :hatoff

Ningsheng2006
29th October 2009, 06:23 PM
"A" Gps-unit that can talk to the laptop.
This doesn't necessarily mean that you need to have a "full" GPS nav system like f.i. a Garmin 60..

A "mouse" GPS capable of talking to the laptop is sufficient.
And that is a kind of blackbox that receives the GPS signals, convert them into a position and sending that position to the lappy.
This mouse-GPS has no display. You could look at it as just being an active antenna for the laptop, needed because the laptop (most of them anyway :sad2 ) has no build-in GPS-receiver.

THis makes more sense now. Thanks. :swim

mihermano
30th October 2009, 05:08 PM
Could a kind person please explain the advantages of such a setup, as opposed to just using the handheld mounted on the dash (apart from the obviously bigger screen)?

Please excuse my apparent ignorance. :help

Michael
30th October 2009, 05:54 PM
Could a kind person please explain the advantages of such a setup
Mainly toys for the boys :hysterica

Apart from the big screen, the main advantage has been the ability to run OziExplorer with a range of off-road & 4X4 maps topographic maps. Thes maps have been available for years & paper maps can be scanned & calibrated for use in Ozi.

Standard handhelds run vector maps, & untill recent years there were no vector topo maps available for Australia.
This has changed with the advent of free maps like Shonky, OSM & CA. & commercial maps like OzTopo & TopoAust.

Another big change is the arrival of the TwoNav GPS which has on-road vector maps loaded & also can be loaded with almost any map available in raster format.

GoWhere?
2nd November 2009, 10:20 AM
Standard handhelds run vector maps

Not entirely correct, should read "most standard handhelds"

BTW, the only attraction (that I am aware of) to use raster is that you can scan your own maps in and use them. Other than that it's far inferior to vector maps. Try zooming in close and you'll see what I mean. I also note that the ability to put home made raster maps onto a vector mapping GPS is becoming more common. Eg the latest update for the colorado 300 allows this.

Nicko
2nd November 2009, 12:14 PM
The Vector maps don't have the additional info you do like the Raster maps at the moment.

Michael
2nd November 2009, 01:55 PM
Not entirely correct, should read "most standard handhelds"
Agreed, was trying to keep answer simple without adding lots of its buts & maybes.

BTW, the only attraction (that I am aware of) to use raster is that you can scan your own maps in and use them. Other than that it's far inferior to vector maps.
Sorry I disagree, neither is inferior or superior!!!
There are excellent properties of both, & some situations where one type suits a person better than the other.
It is a personal SUBJECTIVE choice.

Nicko
2nd November 2009, 02:14 PM
There are excellent properties of both, & some situations where one type suits a person better than the other. It is a personal SUBJECTIVE choice

Subjective maybe but primarily the fact that vector do not have the details the raster has, no doubt will do one day when they expand on the objects that can be created to account for various physical elements.

GoWhere?
3rd November 2009, 01:31 PM
It is true that the Hema raster maps for eg have more detail than say OzTopo. But, IME this forces raster maps to be viewed at their intended zoom level which hinders detailed track/route viewing and map detail viewing. Naturally, this might not be something your interested in and so yes, personal preference - horses for courses. Raster may be fine for outback touring but no good for bushwalking or geocaching.

On the Hema Navigator for eg, the view scale as far as I can tell is similar to that of their paper maps. I drove around a dam with one recently and could see very little if any of the track detail nor the finer points of the landscape details. Zooming in was of little benefit since I did not get more detail from the map, only a larger version of what I already had. On my vector maps, I could zoom right in see minute detail in all aspect. My conclusion was that I would be better off sticking with my vector maps and buying a HEMA map book for the extra detail missed.

Nicko
3rd November 2009, 01:34 PM
It is true that the Hema raster maps for eg have more detail than say OzTopo.
No, most maps including Hema for all of Australia coverage is 1:250k with pockets of 1:100k and 1:50k and if you are really lucky 1:25k.

OzTopo has more tracks info than Hema maps, and is equivalent to 1:25k, so says Brian.

The Hema Navigator only has the 1:250k maps installed, you have to buy the other detailed maps.

I will be supplying 1:100k maps shortly for our TwoNav range.

TheSpartan
3rd January 2011, 06:47 PM
Could a kind person please explain the advantages of such a setup, as opposed to just using the handheld mounted on the dash (apart from the obviously bigger screen)?

Please excuse my apparent ignorance. :help

I have similar setup and use it to quickly identify track location and exit reoutes when on forest tracks. It is faster on a larger screen. It also provides audio turn by turn for pre-set waypoints.