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Thread: Leech Bites

  1. #1

    Leech Bites

    For all those who have prolonged reactions to leech bites, try this. ---HONEY--- No Frills will do. For the record, I used Yellow Box no name honey.
    Just put a small amount on a bandaid and place it over the bite. Keep on for about 48 hours (changing as required).
    I have always suffered badly from leech bites with them remaining itchy and raised for many days and sometimes weeks. Two weeks ago I had a very angry leech bite. I wanted to scratch my ankle off it was that bad. As I had just successfully mended an infected cut with honey and bandaid, I thought I would give it a try. It actually began to sting a little after 5 minutes, just for a few seconds, then nothing else. After 48 hours I took the bandaid off to just a small wound. No infection, no thickening of skin etc. Today the bite location is barely visible.
    I am about to add a small portion of honey, in an air tight jar, to the first aid kit for when I do my next leechy bushwalk.
    Using billions of $$$ worth of satellites to find Tupperware in the bush!
    Profile for bshwckr

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    East Bentleigh Victoria Aust
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    Thanks for that, am going to the Otways for a 5 day walk with my yr 9 students next month.
    Last year at Blanket Bay I had the grandfather of all leeches under my shirt for a couple of hours before I found it as it dropped off leaving a bleeding itchy wound.
    Will make sure I take honey.
    regards Michael

    yacht racing at RMYS
    Lake Mountain Ski Patrol
    bush walking anywhere in Vic

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Gloucester, NSW
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    The things you learn here!

    Tks for the tip.

  4. #4
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    Jan 2008
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    Coffs Harbour, NSW
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    Hi All,

    And a pinch of salt makes them drop off quickly. Also a lighted cigarette does the same but may not be available as we have all given up smoking or the fire bans don't let us light one.



    Darylr

  5. #5
    I find it best to let them fall off on their own once on. If you force them off with heat,salt,repelent spray etc, they tend to regurgitate into the bite. There is a method of scraping them off but I can never remember which way to scrape.
    Using billions of $$$ worth of satellites to find Tupperware in the bush!
    Profile for bshwckr

  6. #6
    I am lucky enough to have hardly any reaction to them at all. I always just flick them off quickly.

    But this sounds like it causes some people some problems.

    I originally come for the Illawarra region so used to get them all the time. Even found myself once with an itchy navel while clearing lantana behind my house. Sure enough a leech had got right in.

    - Two Snakes
    http://www.envirotalk.com.au/forum/

    For a closer look at those two snakes...

    ...and they aren't friendly.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
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    Raw Honey best

    Commercial beekeepers often use heat to increase production and this destroys some of the useful antibacterial emzymes. Unheated "raw" honey works best. This is now being used as a wound dressing in some hospitals as this type of honey is antifungal, antibactieral and water absorbant just the thing for some wounds.
    This is not a new discovery as it was used in ancient roman times.

  8. #8
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    There I was thinking my Mrs was confused when I thought her idea of raw honey was the same as mine... not processed.
    The sun rises and sets, the moon wax and wanes, oceans ebb and rise, warmth of spring and the coolness of autumn and my heart beats as if I belong to them all.
    www.gpsaustralia.net

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Canberra, Australia
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    Nylon stockings also work

    Nylon socks/stockings will also prevent then from taking hold in the first place (also works for bluebottles and box jellyfish). This would only annoy crocs (get stuck in their teeth) so I don't recommend it for north Australia.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    East Bentleigh Victoria Aust
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    stockings will also prevent then from taking hold in the first place
    Trouble is - I prefer wool (or wool blend) socks for bushwalking.
    Next you will be telling me to wear high heels as well.
    regards Michael

    yacht racing at RMYS
    Lake Mountain Ski Patrol
    bush walking anywhere in Vic

  11. My grandpa always recommended a mix of 1 part metho to 4 parts vegetable oil - never used it myself - don't have a clue if it works....

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Watsa leech?
    Neville
    40 52' 33"S 175 4' 17"E - 42.521m

  13. Whats a leech ?

    It's like a small worm that is found in creeks / rivers / dams. It sucks on to your skin and drinks your blood. They have some sort of numbing / anaesthetic effect that stops you from feeling the bite. They stay latched on to you until they get really fat (full of your blood). You can get them off with salt or a lighter.

    Go to:

    http://www.sciencefriday.com/news/04...ws0419071.html

    for a picture

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Wellington - NZ
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    Hi darrylslater

    I do know really!

    Experienced them during our 3 year Aus holiday.
    VERY rare here in NZ??
    Neville
    40 52' 33"S 175 4' 17"E - 42.521m

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Williamstown
    Posts
    23

    Leech Removal

    Identify the anterior (oral) sucker which will be found at the small end of the leech.
    Put your finger on your skin adjacent to the oral sucker
    Gently but firmly slide your finger toward the wound where the leech is feeding. Using your fingernail, push the sucker sideways away from your skin.
    Once you have dislodged the oral sucker, quickly detach the posterior (rear) sucker (the fat end of the leech). Try flicking the leech or proding with your fingernail. As you work to remove the leech, it will attempt to reattach itself.
    Keep the wound clean -- minor cuts in tropical climates can quickly become infected. The leech itself is not poisonous. The wound will itch as it heals.

    Might be easier wearing stocckings!!!!!
    Go boldly where no one has gone before!!

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